Milwaukee School of Engineering: Rethink What’s Possible

The Blue Lotus Farm and Retreat Center near West Bend, Wisconsin, has a new bath house complete with a hydraulic-assisted lift table, wash station and changing area thanks to the work of students at Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE). Blue Lotus serves those with profound life challenges of any age by providing accessible outdoor recreational and therapeutic opportunities in a caring, accepting and inspiring 64-acre day camp setting. Researchers at MSOE and the Medical College of Wisconsin are collaborating with undergraduate MSOE students to use artificial intelligence, neural networks and MSOE’s supercomputer to identify and assess the severity of damage to blood vessels in kidneys. One hundred K-12 students at the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee and Mil­waukee Public Schools now have their very own desks at home, complete with a desktop computer. MSOE students designed and built the desks for the young students to support them during pandemic-induced virtual learning, and an MSOE alumnus donated refurbished computers for each student. MSOE mechanical engineering students helped create a way to implement self-healing properties in 3D-printed materials—a key novel feature that will allow additively manufactured parts to self-repair and restore their lost mechanical properties. These are but a few examples of MSOE’s hands-on, application-oriented approach to teaching and learning. At MSOE, there is a different way of thinking, acting and existing. It’s a way of life that faculty, students, staff and alumni exhibit each day which inspires them to make an impact within their communities – it’s the MSOE Mindset. The MSOE Mindset is an assimilation of the Servant-Leader Mindset, the Entre­preneurial Mindset, and MSOE’s mission, vision and values. It identifies graduates as leaders of character; responsible professionals; passionate learners; and value creators. Faculty focus on helping students develop the MSOE Mindset throughout their educational journey. By leveraging its industry partnerships, incorporating high-impact educational practices throughout campus and enhancing educational programs to deepen experiential learning, MSOE ensures that all students use real-world projects in their field of study. This real-world experience translates into career success. MSOE offers the highest ROI and average early and mid-career salaries of any college or university in Wisconsin according to PayScale Inc. And in Georgetown University’s report, “A First Try at ROI: Ranking 4,500 Colleges,” MSOE was at the top of the list, offering the highest return on investment of all colleges and universities in Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa and Minnesota that offer bachelor’s degrees. “As I reflect on the decision I made 20 years ago on which college to attend, I find myself being thankful that at such a young age I had the vision and the support of my parents to choose MSOE. Life can be defined as a series of forks in the road and when presented with the choice of MSOE or the other five colleges I was considering, I chose MSOE and I’ve never regretted the decision,” said Lisa Vanlerberghe, a 2002 industrial engineering graduate who is now the senior director of plant operations for MillerCoors. “At the time, I thought it was expensive but I knew the short-term and long-term benefits would pay off. The high placement rate landed me a great job with a competitive salary before starting my senior year.” MSOE’s undergraduate engineering programs have been ranked among the top 10 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. MSOE is also highly ranked by Forbes, Business Insider, Princeton Review, PayScale Inc. and others. The University offers bachelor’s degrees in actuarial science, business administration, computer science, construction management, nursing, user experience, and architectural, bio­­medical, biomolecular, civil, computer, electrical, industrial, mechanical and software engineering. Learn more today and rethink what’s possible at msoe.edu.

Milwaukee School of Engineering: Rethink What’s Possible